Monday, 3 October 2011

It Never Happened As What They Dreampt




The people of some of the villages under Chargharay and Laharayni gewog, under Samtse Dzongkhag today has one common thing to say that, the hope for the development and raising income of the people by the mining activities has just been a dream. The people of Jitti village who donated their land free for the construction of the road that passes by their village for mining activities, once hoped that the road shall be soon black topped and their access to better transportation  and general livelihood of the people  would turn better.
But now, they silently whisper among themselves with fear and not knowing for whom to tell, the devastation that the mining activities has brought to them.
They say that they are paid with the dust for the land that they have donated for the construction of road; they had a hope that they could see the black road but it has remained white ever since it was first opened. They breathe in the quartzite dust every time the truck passes by their village. An elderly person even complains that he has caught asthma, and he believes that it was that dust responsible for that.
The villager says the green hill with tall trees, where once they heard the deer bark and the forest from where they collected firewood has now turned to white desert. It has sucked up a stream that down flowed and dried up several water sources. Even after decades of their operation, it has neither provided any employment for the local people nor has raised any income to the people.
If you ask them, they would smile in disguise and tell you they have access to road, and if you are a traveler there during summer, you could find it no more than the drain where quartzite solution flows.
So many BG vehicles ply and mining managers walk but none had even asked if people were happy and donation of their land for mining was worthy of their choice?
Gup and Tshogpas says it has been put in DYT meetings and even petitions have been submitted to Dzongkhag several times, but their words have not even been answered verbally, forget about by the action of development.
Now nowhere to go and none to tell, this has only been a household talk. I believe the proprietor and the management of the concerned mining activities and government may look into this matter and their voice be heard.